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Ray Towers
May 25
Does anyone know the trick to identify inversions in diminished chords? After some practice I can now guess the root in major and minor chords, but I find diminished chords specially difficult.
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Josh Keisler
May 26
Yeah, my way of telling between diminished inversions is.. first I determine whether it's root or not by listening for the tritone or major sixth interval between the bottom and top note - if it's a tritone it's root and if major sixth it's first or second. Then to figure out if it's first or second I listen for the distribution of the notes - so if it sounds like there is an isolated top note and two lower notes then I know it's first inversion (the intervals will be minor 3rd between bottom two and tritone between second and top so quite a difference). 2nd inversion will be the other way round. This has worked for me pretty well so far for the first couple of levels that have diminished inversions though sometimes it takes me a little while. Good luck!
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Ray Towers
May 26
Thanks Josh! I think this is an excellent advice. I find specially helpful to determine whether it's root or not by listening for the tritone or major sixth interval between the bottom and top note. To find the position of the third is going to be a little harder :D
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Josh Keisler
May 26
It is a little harder yes but I find it do-able, just FYI it’s the same kind of technique I use for distinguishing between sus2 and sus4 (determining where I’m hearing the cluster of two vs the one isolated)
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Hugo Paris
May 26
@Josh Keisler I like your approach - thank you!
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Josh Keisler
May 26
Thanks for the support guys :) I wanna update my comment a little more because I was playing Inversionist more earlier and I found I'm increasingly able to distinguish the diminished inversion just from note distribution. For me, that isolated note really pokes out so if I don't hear that and the notes sound equally spaced then I know it's root inversion. Root also sort of sounds more dense and even more dissonant, though I'm unwilling to use those qualities because the other inversions can sound dense and quite dissonant too.

Then, if I hear that isolated notes that sounds far away from a cluster of two I know it's 1st or 2nd. If the isolated note is on top - 1st. Bottom - 2nd.

You could always use the major 6th vs tritone thing to confirm at any point but for me the note distribution by itself seems to have the potential to be quicker and easier if you get used to it.
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Ray Towers
May 26
I will try that. Thanks!