Everything music & ear training related

ToneGym

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krish singh
Aug 03
has anyone developed relative pitch or atleast made some progress?
please tell and mention for how long you are practising and how much
thanks
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Ray Towers
Aug 03
I have been practicing, mainly my workouts, for a little more than three months now. Sometimes I am impressed by how, little by little, I have been improving my ears thanks to constant work. (For example, recognizing the distance between two notes when they are played simultaneously, which was unimaginable for me).
However, I'll have to practice a lot more in order to develop my relative pitch at the level I would like. This is expected: People with good ears always tell that it took them a lot of time to develop them.
Like you, I would also like to know the opinions of the veterans 😉
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Developing your sense of relative pitch is one of the main purposes of ToneGym. But it's not like one moment you don't have it and the next you do -- it's something that improves over time. I can only say that my ability to identify and produce specific intervals has definitely improved in the 4 months I have been using ToneGym. You can see that happening via your progress in the various games.
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krish singh
Aug 03
thanks for motivating me
actually i am learning to play piano from pianoforall course.it is mentioned that you will be able to play by ears but i dont trust it as there is not a single ear training exercise in it.
and yes may i know for how much time you practice every day and do you play any instrument
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@krish singh : On ToneGym, I do the daily workout every weekday. I will often repeat a game if I fail to advance a level, but not always.

I've been in choir for years, so when choir is in season, I'm practicing voice for something like 5 hours a week between rehearsals and home practice. Consequently, I do better on Interval Barks and Solfegiator than most other games.

At about the same time I started on ToneGym (when I retired earlier this year), I also started practicing guitar for about an hour each weekday (been playing guitar for decades, but never with any sort of practice regimen) and piano for about 30 minutes each weekday. I also play guitar on weekends, but more free-form fun than focused practice.

Just playing piano WILL help train your ears somewhat, but you are right that it won't be as effective as dedicated ear training. My experience with voice also supports that. I may have a leg up on the voice-oriented games because of my experience, but I also still had a lot of room to improve, and improve I have.
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@krish singh : The other thing to realize when people talk about playing by ear is that there are two parts to that -- the playing and the ear. You can't play by ear without knowing how to play. It's not some shortcut to becoming proficient at an instrument. On piano, you still want to do scale and chords exercises to get your facility on the keyboard up to snuff. Over time, and with the help of ear training like this site, your brain will start to make the connections between what note relationships look like in sheet music, what they look like on a keyboard, how to play them on a keyboard, what they sound like when someone else plays them, and what they sound like when you play them. It's all mutually reinforcing. Focusing on one aspect is not the way to go. Approach your musical journey from as many different angles as you can bear.

I will say, though, that the reason people often recommend piano as a basis is that it is laid out linearly so that the note relationships are really easy to see. It's also easier to visualize, discover, and explore, more advanced concepts like inversions, line clichés, different chord colors and relationships, and modes.
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Hugo Paris
Aug 03
I have been using the platform consistently for the past 4 months. My relative pitch has grown tremendously. Doing the workouts consistently, every day is key for me. Keeping to the workout and not re-doing the games currently helps me with putting my full focus into the games, and not feel burnout. Just focused and steady.

Functional ear training can be very helpful in unlocking growth between the games. There's a great app called functional ear trainer. It's free and I would highly recommend it to anyone who wants to develop relative pitch.
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Cuantas Vacas
Aug 04
Even though I 'was born' with that ability and I developed it by studying music theory as a kid, so many years ago, it's been through ToneGym daily workouts that I've turned relative pitch into a proper musical skill.

So I'd say sticking to daily exercises for 1-2 months should be enough for you to feel a good progress.
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krish singh
Aug 04
yes i am using some other resources like functional ear trainer , tonedear etc
but the problem is no community support there so i often post my queries here
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I've been using Tonegym almost every day for 5 weeks and definitely see (ear I should say :)) some positive improvements.
I mostly stick to intervals and singing games so far: Departurer, Lander, Intervalis, Interval Barks, Mélody Jay, Solfègiator, Notationist, Calibrator, Melodix
Chords are very tricky, but I believe will get easier once I solidify the basics.
I can now recognise some intervals instantly, which was reaaally not the case some weeks ago.
But some days are better than other, be patient and consistent, it will pay off for sure.
I find the game easier if I do vocal warmups along with my guitar before, singing/playing scales and triads.
Rick Beato ear training youtube exercises are awesome.
Usually after 15min/20min my performances on the games start to fall, so better split your practice in chunks i guess.
Also as mentioned by others, connecting with your voice is very important and will ease most games if you sing them.
Apps like Functional ear trainer, Chet and Ella are very good additions.
Good luck and keep it up!
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Anirudh K
Aug 04
i've been using sound gym for almost 4 months and tonegym for almost 2-2.5 months. both have helped me quite a lot, tbh! before using tonegym, i didnt have much problem with relative pitch, but I've definitely become better now, especially in trying to find inversions, thanks to inversionist game. my only suggestion to you is, whatever your work schedule is, just do daily workout, which might take you 15 minutes tops.do it consistently, every single day, without fail for atleast 2 or 3 months. you can come back to this post and comment on your progress then 😁 Good luck to you!
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Hugo Paris
Aug 05
@krish singh the community is great here
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Brian Blades
Aug 05
I've made improvement in all areas (melodic dictation, chord recognition, inversions, ect.). It's been a gradual process. I've been at it about 6 months.

Edit - I should also add that I was 'decent' at some of these before I started (especially intervals since I had worked on those a bit previously) but there's no doubt that I've made significant improvements since that time.