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ToneGym

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Gunnar Maaß
Apr 22
Hey! Some time ago I think I came across this principle for chord voicing that the interval character loses "edge" or "intensity" when you increase the interval width in octaves. (For example M2 having quite a bit of friction, M9 clearing up quite a bit sounding somewhat cloudy, M16 sounding even "cleaner" but still remaining some little bit of that initial tension)

Does anyone know how this or a similar principle is called or where to find more about that topic online? I'd like to get a bit more aware about the wider intervals.
How do you perceive the change of interval character over octaves?
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Matthias CJB
Apr 22
I guess this is due to the harmonic overtones which are further apart if you add an octave an interval.
I don’t know if you are familiar with the physical principles of notes. It‘s fascinating stuff and pretty much explains why there is less friction if you go beyond an octave. It has to do with less „Schwebungen“ (in German, I guess it’s called beating in English).
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Hugo Paris
Apr 22
I had felt this before but never put words on it. Thank you both!
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Matthias CJB
Apr 22
Reflecting on my comment: overtones surely play a role, but the effect ist the same with sine waves. But it surely has to do with Schwebung/beating of frequencies
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Gunnar Maaß
Apr 23
Thanks for the input. I'm not so sure about M3 though. M10 often kind of sounds more intense/shiny to me.
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Matthias CJB
Apr 23
Oh yeah. I really love the thirds up an octave! I think the emotional response can‘t really be explain scientifically and simple must be felt.
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XIN 4tus
Apr 27
This is called 'Spread voicing"