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ToneGym

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Nazza Nazario
Aug 13
Good afternoon guys. How are you?
I need help with a question of music theory. I'm here with a song that was apparently composed with the melody in the harmonic minor scale of Db but there is only one note in this melody that is a Cb instead of C. It would be interesting to go through the Cb chord at this time or it would be better to find an alternative to that enters the scale? (Sorry if there is any English error, please)
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yooval mann
Aug 14
Hi Mateus I'd like to try and help you but I am not sure I understand the issue, is it possible for you to show me the score? Or maybe make a video showing the issue?
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you can use Db7 as a dominant chord for Gb minor which is the 4th
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What chord comes after the Cb?
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Anthony Jones
Aug 14
The HARMONIC minor scale is so-called because it is the foundation of particular chords (harmonies). It is not used commonly for melodies as well.
If you have chord V as a major, it gives you a semitone resolution of the raised 7 note to the tonic in the progression V - i, which sounds satisfying. However, the melody doesn't necessarily follow exactly what the chords do. If a melody has a raised 6 and 7 note going up, that sounds satisfying. On the way down, notes 7 and 6 can be lowered, and THAT also sounds satisfying. That is a MELODIC minor scale.
If you are the composer, you do what sounds good to you.
There are many examples where the melody and the chords don't necessarily hit the same notes. A prominent example is Radiohead's Pyramid Song. The chords played by piano and bass are based on the minor 7, the tonic, the flattened 2, and the minor 3. The tonic chords are sometimes minor and sometimes major, changing with the vocal melody hitting the minor 3. Those chords sound like they are outlining a Phrygian mode, but the vocal melody does not hit the flat 2.
Understand the rules ... and then break them!