Everything music & ear training related

ToneGym

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Joy Harding
Sep 07
Route 6 (progressions) Does anyone have any good tips? I'm not doing well on this one.
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Miles Walker
Sep 08
It depends what you're having trouble with - you can get quite far just being able to differentiate major, minor and diminished chords. (Major have capital Roman numerals, minor have lowercase and diminished are lowercase with a circle after). What would you say you're struggling with?
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Joy Harding
Sep 16
I get min and diminished chords mixed up. They both sound 'sad' to me
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Joy Harding
Sep 23
But thanks for the tip about major and minor-that is definitely some help.
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Singing the intervals of the root notes of the chords really helps me.
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Amber Panting
Sep 28
Agree both sad but for me the minor chords sound sad but healthy, diminished sound like they're sick - it's not a clean sound, something is clashing. That works for me, asking if it sounds healthy or not
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If the progression has a mix of major, minor, and/or diminished chords, you can often get the answer just by listening to the pattern of chord character and matching that to one of the answers. But not always.

Some chord transitions -- like V-I -- are common and recognizable enough that you can just hear them. Or over time, you start to get to that point.

If all else fails, I will listen for one note in each chord. I will then match those notes on a keyboard and see what the intervals between them are. I will then see which of the choices have notes that go through those same interval patterns. As a reference, I write down all the chords based on the scale degrees in question, using C as a reference. Note that it doesn't really matter whether the progression is actually in C, since you are looking for interval patterns, not absolute notes. It's just a handy reference.